Tourmaline Mining

Tourmaline Mining

Tourmaline Mining exploration with Crystal World

Tourmaline Mining

Tom Kapitany with Patrick Gundersen , David Sheumack and Rob Horner are doing a little exploring for gem tourmaline.

Tourmaline in our shop

Tourmaline is a six-member ring cyclosilicate having a trigonal crystal system. It occurs as long, slender to thick prismatic and columnar crystals that are usually triangular in cross-section, often with curved striated faces. The style of termination at the ends of crystals is sometimes asymmetrical, called hemimorphism. Small slender prismatic crystals are common in a fine-grained granite called aplite, often forming radial daisy-like patterns. Tourmaline is distinguished by its three-sided prisms; no other common mineral has three sides. Prisms faces often have heavy vertical striations that produce a rounded triangular effect. Tourmaline is rarely perfectly euhedral. An exception was the fine dravite tourmalines of Yinnietharra, in western Australia. The deposit was discovered in the 1970s, but is now exhausted. All hemimorphic crystals are piezoelectric, and are often pyroelectric as well.

Tourmaline has a variety of colors. Usually, iron-rich tourmalines are black to bluish-black to deep brown, while magnesium-rich varieties are brown to yellow, and lithium-rich tourmalines are almost any color: blue, green, red, yellow, pink, etc. Rarely, it is colorless. Bi-colored and multicolored crystals are common, reflecting variations of fluid chemistry during crystallization. Crystals may be green at one end and pink at the other, or green on the outside and pink inside; this type is called watermelon tourmaline. Some forms of tourmaline are dichroic, in that they change color when viewed from different directions.

The pink color of tourmalines from many fields is the result of prolonged natural irradiation. During their growth, these tourmaline crystals incorporated Mn2+ and were initially very pale. Due to natural gamma ray exposure from radioactive decay of 40K in their granitic environment, gradual formation of Mn3+ ions occurs, which is responsible for the deepening of the pink to red color.[12]

Source- Wikipedia

Tourmaline Mining

Checking the geology

Tourmaline Mining

Crystalline materials from the pegmatite

Tourmaline Mining

Smiling at the results

Tourmaline Mining

While smoky Quartz is not the target, some nice gemmy crystals are welcome.

Tourmaline Mining

Blue Tourmaline on Quartz

Tourmaline Mining

Blue Tourmaline

Tourmaline Mining

Check back soon for further developments!

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January 19th, 2016